Top 5 Waterfalls in National Parks of America

As the weather in North America finally begins to improve, temperatures rise and snow and ice melt. Rivers start flowing again and waterfalls reach their absolute peak in terms of water volume. In this post, we’ve listedour greatest top 5 waterfalls in national parks of America – the United States of America.

Top 5 Waterfalls in National Parks of America

Just a quick note before we continue. There are many dozens of gorgeous waterfalls all over the USA, from Maine to California, from Alaska to Montana. But very few compare to the following five waterfalls in national parks of America. All of these are nothing short of spectacular, and among the star attractions in their respective national parks.

5. Dark Hollow Falls, Shenandoah National Park

Dark Hollow Falls, Shenandoah National Park
Dark Hollow Falls

Of all waterfalls in Shenandoah National Park, Dark Hollow Falls is the most accessible and most visited. Located near Big Meadows, arguably the park’s main tourist area, the falls are reached via a short but steep trail. This series of cascades is one of the main highlights in the park, a must-visit if you’re driving Skyline Drive.

4. Laurel Falls, Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Laurel Falls, Great Smoky Mountains National Park - Best National Park Waterfalls
Laurel Falls – Photo by Pete via Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Named after the mountain laurel that paints the Blue Ridge landscape in whites and pinks in late spring, Laurel Falls is one of the most beautiful waterfalls in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. You can reach this 80-foot waterfall on a paved hiking trail, making them accessible for most people. Do keep in mind, though, that there are steep drop-offs. Also, this is bear country, so keep your kids closeby.

3. Myrtle Falls, Mount Rainier National Park

 

Myrtle Falls, Mount Rainier National Park
Myrtle Falls

 

Mount Rainier National Park has more than its fair share of impressive waterfalls. All along the park’s roads, you’ll find picturesque falls and cascades. The greatest one, however, is in the Paradise area, reached on a pleasant and short hike. Myrtle Falls, thundering down a cliff, is backed by Mount Rainier itself. Some would say this is the classic image of this superb national park just south of Seattle.

2. Yosemite Falls, Yosemite National Park

Yosemite Falls - Waterfalls in National Parks of America
Yosemite Falls

One of the world’s highest waterfalls, Yosemite Falls is one of the star attractions in a park dotted with spectacular natural features. The waterfall is at its most powerful from April through June. A prominent feature in Yosemite Valley, it is visible from several different locations in the park. The recommended way to see them, however, is one a long and strenuous day hike to the falls’ top.

1. Havasu Falls, Grand Canyon National Park

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Gorgeous Havasu Falls is unparalleled in the world. This mesmerizingly beautiful series of waterfalls in the Grand Canyon lies in the Havasupai Indian Reservation, an area separate from the park’s main South Rim tourist area. A collection of waterfalls, cascades and natural pools, this is the undeniable number one in this list of waterfalls in national parks of America. Note that you need a reservation to visit the falls and that no day hiking as allowed. This is a strenuous overnight camping trip.

Have you ever visited any of the waterfalls in national parks of America? Leave a comment below!

About Bram

Website: http://www.travel-experience-live.com

Bram is a Belgian guy who’s currently living in the USA. For over four years now, he has been wandering the globe, with jobs here and there in between. So far, his travels have taken him to four continents and twenty-two countries. Bram likes to try different styles of travelling: from backpacker and adventurer to tourist and local, he has been all those stereotypes and probably will be many more in the future. You can follow his adventures on his travel blog, on Twitter and on Facebook.

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