Why you should make La Digue part of your next vacation

Soporific La Digue is the epitome of tropical languidity. The Seychelles’ fourth largest island by area and the third by population after Mahe and Praslin, it has a considerably slower pace than either, making it the perfect choice if you’re looking for somewhere to kick back and relax. Here are some of the best things to do in La Digue Seychelles.

Best Things to Do in La Digue Seychelles: Cycling in La Digue
Cycling on La Digue

Best Things to Do in La Digue, Seychelles

What’s there to see?

The action centres around La Passe, the island’s main settlement clustered around the jetty. There, you’ll find the greatest concentration of hotels, restaurants, cafes and other tourist services, where you can arrange boat trips and bicycle rental. Beyond the port, you don’t have to travel very far before clusters of buildings thin to a straggle, leaving just a smoothly paved road which takes you past verdant hillsides and impossibly beautiful beaches. It’s this road which will take you to the island’s unspoilt eastern coast where giant tortoises roam free – just about the only thing that will hold you up on this almost traffic-free paradise.

Best Things to Do in La Digue Seychelles: Giant tortoise strolling down the road
Giant tortoise strolling down the road

Visit Anse Severe

One of the best things to do in La Digue is beach bumming! A loop of a few kilometres to the northern tip of the island and beyond leads you to Anse Severe, one of the best stretches of ocean for snorkelling. Its crystal clear waters and ivory powder sand fulfil every tropical island cliche there is, yet somehow that doesn’t matter. Under the shade of casuarina and takamaka trees, there’s nothing more pleasant than to cool off with a thirst-quenching freshly squeezed juice or fresh coconut.

Best Things to Do in La Digue Seychelles: Fruit stall, Anse Severe
Fruit stall, Anse Severe

Visit an Art Gallery

The road undulates over headlands and alongside photogenic bays to reach George Camille‘s gallery. This popular local artist’s work is eclectic but easy on the eye, with colourful pieces reflecting the vibrant island’s landscapes and people. Further still, past Anse Banane, you’ll reach the end of the road, but who’s complaining when the beach is as pretty as they come?

Best Things to Do in La Digue Seychelles: No shortage of beautiful beaches on La Digue
No shortage of beautiful beaches on La Digue

L’Union Estate

Freewheeling south out of La Passe past Anse Reunion, the road is mercifully flat all the way to L’Union Estate. There, an old plantation house waits to be restored alongside rows of vanilla plants, their roots protected by coconut shells. You’ll see oil being extracted the old fashioned way, the ox protected from the hot sun as it toils under the thatched roof. But the jewel of the estate is one of the world’s most famous beaches, Anse Source d’Argent. Huge granite boulders piled high form a natural barrier at either end of this stunning beach, but time your visit for low tide as the sand almost disappears when the waves reach their peak.

Best Things to Do in La Digue Seychelles: Picture perfect Anse Source d'Argent
Picture perfect Anse Source d’Argent

Anse Coco and Other Attractions

The path forks just short of the estate and the road bears left towards the island’s other must-see attraction. A glorious trio of beaches begins after a slow climb and a long but steep descent to Grand Anse. It’s popular with day trippers for lunch, so come early to beat the heat and have the beach to yourself. The current is strong here, so swimming’s not advised. Instead, hike up and over the headland to Petite Anse. It’s a fifteen minute scramble up and over rough and rocky steps but the reward is a beach that’s even more stunning, with shallow rock pools and exquisitely reflected palms to take away what little breath you have left after the exertion of getting there. With a guide, you can continue to delightful Anse Coco – but only if you can tear yourself away.

Best Things to Do in La Digue Seychelles: Petite Anse
Petite Anse

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About JuliaHammond

Website: http://www.juliahammond.co.uk

Julia Hammond is a Geography teacher turned travel writer with a passion for places. Winning Mail Travel's Deep South competition was the catalyst to write for a diverse range of publications including Bradt's Bus Pass Britain Rides Again. She’s written Kindle guides to Cape Town, Peru and London for Unanchor and advice on Savannah for Wanderlust. When not travelling, she can be found at home in Essex planning her next trip, her two golden retrievers curled up at her feet.

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