Aleppo, Syria Photos Before the War

There is absolutely no need to introduce the Syrian city of Aleppo. Having regularly made world news for a few years now, it has become headline news all around the world recently because of the increasing horror associated with the Battle of Aleppo. The situation of Aleppo before the war was, obviously, entirely different than what it is nowadays. The city has become somewhat of a symbol of the pointlessness of the Syrian civil war. Hundreds of thousands of people, most of them civilians, have been killed while many historic buildings have been utterly destroyed. Everyone knows what the city looks like now, but in case you’re wondering what life in Aleppo before the war was like, here are some beautiful Aleppo photos.

There’s no need for too much text in this post. Simply scroll down and see what Aleppo looked like only five years ago.

Aleppo Photos Before the War in Syria

Visitors in the Great Mosque of Aleppo. Aleppo photos
Visitors in the Great Mosque of Aleppo. Creative Commons Image by jrwebbe on Flickr. CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
The roofs of Aleppo, Syria. Aleppo photos
The roofs of Aleppo, Syria. Creative Commons Image by Michal Unolt on Flickr.CC BY-NC 2.0
Spices in an Aleppo market. Aleppo photos
Spices in an Aleppo market. Creative Commons Image by Michal Unolt on Flickr. CC BY-NC 2.0
Aleppo before the war: the Great Mosque in Alepp. Aleppo photos
Great Mosque, Aleppo. Creative Commons Image by Stijn Hüwels on Flickr. CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
Ancient City of Aleppo. Aleppo photos
Ancient City of Aleppo. Creative Commons Image by Pietro Ferreira on Flickr. CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
Evening on the streets of Aleppo. Aleppo photos
Evening on the streets of Aleppo. Creative Commons Images by Charles Hajj on Flickr. CC BY 2.0
Citadel of Aleppo. Aleppo photos
Citadel of Aleppo. Creative Commons Image by yeowatzup on Flickr. CC BY 2.0
Children playing in Aleppo. Aleppo photos
Children playing in Aleppo. Creative Commons Image by Michal Unolt on Flickr. CC BY-NC 2.0
Bustling bazaar in Aleppo before the war. Aleppo photos
Bustling bazaar in Aleppo, Syria. Creative Commons Image by Pietro Ferreira on Flickr. CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
Great Mosque in Aleppo. Aleppo photos
Great Mosque in Aleppo. Creative Commons Image by Varun Shiv Kapur on Flickr. CC BY 2.0

It used to be the third-biggest city in the Ottoman Empire, third only after Constantinople (modern-day Istanbul) and Cairo. It was the second-largest city in Syria and the country’s economic capital. Before the war, Aleppo was home to more than two million people, making it one of the most important cities in the entire Levant.

The city’s historic location between the Mediterranean Sea and Mesopotamia (modern-day Iraq) made it a major trading center for literally millennia. The earliest documentations of Aleppo date back to the 3rd millennium BC. It has been—and still is—one of the world’s oldest inhabited cities.

This all makes it all the more crushing to see it destroyed. Both historic sites and human lives have been lost. It’s a disaster of catastrophic proportions, of a magnitude comparable, maybe even exceeding, the horrors of Rwanda and Srebrenica.

After looking at these wonderful Aleppo photos before the war, we would love to hear your opinions and thoughts on this terrible war. Please share them in the comments below.

About Bram

Website: http://www.travel-experience-live.com

Bram is a Belgian guy who's currently living in the USA. For over four years now, he has been wandering the globe, with jobs here and there in between. So far, his travels have taken him to four continents and twenty-two countries. Bram likes to try different styles of travelling: from backpacker and adventurer to tourist and local, he has been all those stereotypes and probably will be many more in the future. You can follow his adventures on his travel blog, on Twitter and on Facebook.

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